Physiological Effects Of Kinesio Taping

Physiological Effects Of Kinesio Taping

For damaged muscle, the tape is applied UNSTRETCHED. In this case, we stretch the skin of the affected area before application of the tape. This is done by stretching the muscles and joints in the affected area. After application, the taped skin will form convolutions when the skin and muscles contract back to their normal position. When the skin is lifted by this technique, the flow of blood and lymphatic fluid beneath the skin improves.

Kinesio Taping alleviates pain and facilitates lymphatic drainage by microscopically lifting the skin. The taped portion forms convolutions in the skin, thus increasing interstitial space. The result is that pressure and irritation are taken off the neural and sensory receptors, alleviating pain. Pressure is gradually taken off the lymphatic system, allowing it to channel more freely.

On the other hand, if joints or ligaments are injured, the tape should be STRETCHED before application to the skin. The damaged joints or ligaments are incapable of functioning normally and rely on stretched tape for correction. It is also important to note that while depending on the injury, tape is either stretched or not stretched, this does not mean that the actual application technique will change. Kinesio Taping is based on a different philosophy that aims to give free range of motion in order to allow the body’s muscular system to heal itself bio-mechanically.

The Main Functions of Kinesio Taping
  • Muscle and joint re-education (through increased proprioceptive input)
  • Decreases pain
  • Limits over-extension and over-contraction of muscle tissue
  • Decreases muscle cramping
  • Assists in reducing edema and inflammation
  • Improves range of motion
  • Helps decrease muscular fatigue
  • Stabilizes joints after Chiropractic Manipulative Therapy